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Spring is all about layering! Pairing different jackets with different necklines of tops can be tricky. I’m breaking it all down today!

Do you ever get confused about what jackets work with different types of tops? Spring jackets like denim jackets, olive utility jackets, trench coats, and hoodies are all great but can be hard to pair with certain tops. For today’s Get Dressed With Merrick, I’m breaking down what jackets I like best with different necklines.

Outfit details:

STRIPED TEE (Kristy, it’s the one from Walmart) | GOOD AMERICAN JEANS | AZARIA BAG | TRENCH COAT | MADEWELL SUNGLASSES

Here’s the cliff’s notes version

You can wear any jacket over any top with any neckline.

BUT some create more bunching, some look more constricting, some are better seasonally, and some create more or less balance in the outfit.

So this post will show you some necklines/jacket pairings that I like better than others.

Different styles of necklines:

Here’s a list of some common necklines. I’ll break it down with each one and tell you what jackets I would or wouldn’t wear with

  • Scoop Neck

    • Scoop neck is as versatile as it comes! You can wear this neckline with any coat, blazer, jacket or peacoat!
  • Crew neck

    • This neckline is similar to the scoop neck, but higher up on your neck. It’s still very versatile, but pay attention to if your neckline looks constricted at all when wearing crew necks and jackets over the top. Specifically more masculine crew neck tops, like graphic tees, feel the most pinched at the neckline when I’m wearing a denim or suede or leather jacket over the top.
  • Boatneck

    • I rarely wear boat neck tops, but personally I think their appeal is the wide neck which is covered up by any jacket. So if you’re wearing boat neck tops, choose a day to wear them when a jacket isn’t required!
  • Turtleneck

    • Turtlenecks are so wonderful in the colder months to keep your neck warm. And you can absolutely wear a jacket or a blazer or a coat over the top. But if you’re layering over a turtleneck sweater or dress, make sure the turtleneck and layer are similar in weight…a bulky turtleneck and a thick wool coat work great. A bulky turtleneck and a lightweight jacket will create imbalance and too much heaviness around your neck.
  • V-Neck

    • Another classic neckline option, and yes, it goes with basically everything! However, be careful with v-neck t-shirts that might get bunchy underneath a more structured jacket. You want your top to lay nicely underneath your jacket — no bulk or bunching, please!
  • Mock Neck

    • I love mock neck tops, and they can absolutely work with any style of jacket. But be careful with that pinched neck look…it’ll be a case by case situation, so do what feels right for the outfit and you!
  • Collared

    • Whenever I wear collared shirts, I’m wearing them unbuttoned a few buttons. I love that look, but it’s not super conducive to all jackets. The collar can get squashed or bunched underneath. If you’re wearing with a blazer to work, try putting the collar outside the jacket so it lays on top of the blazer’s collar and doesn’t get squished. If that doesn’t suit you, tuck it inside nicely the best you can.
  • Henley

    • Henley necklines are the ones with no collar, but a few buttons down the front. As with any buttoned shirt, I’d just recommend staying away from a jacket that has prominent buttons. For me, double buttons feels cluttered. Instead, choose a jacket with a zipper or one with neutral, more camouflaged buttons.
  • Hooded

    • I love a hoodie sweatshirt or a sweater with a hood. They’re particularly great with jackets and blazers with the hood sticking out. Definitely don’t tuck the hood inside! As for hooded jackets, just don’t pair them with hooded tops…no need for a double hood.
  • Cowl

    • Cowl necks tend to be more popular among a mature crowd and can be cute, but they also add a good amount of bulk at the neck which can be tricky under jackets. If you plan to close your jacket, I’d recommend not choosing a cowl neck top. Otherwise, just choose a jacket or coat or blazer that doesn’t have other embellishments or bulk at the lapels. You don’t need double bulk at your neckline and chest.

I’ve got a Get Dressed With Merrick video showing some examples of these on my instagram tonight…don’t miss it!

IF YOU LIKED THIS POST, YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

What Spring Jackets to Wear With Different Necklines

trench coat with stripes and jeans

Spring is all about layering! Pairing different jackets with different necklines of tops can be tricky. I’m breaking it all down today!

 

Do you ever get confused about what jackets work with different types of tops? Spring jackets like denim jackets, olive utility jackets, trench coats, and hoodies are all great but can be hard to pair with certain tops. For today’s Get Dressed With Merrick, I’m breaking down what jackets I like best with different necklines.

 

Outfit details:

STRIPED TEE | GOOD AMERICAN JEANS | AZARIA BAG |TRENCH COAT | MADEWELL SUNGLASSES

 

 

Here’s the cliff’s notes version

You can wear any jacket over any top with any neckline.

BUT some create more bunching, some look more constricting, some are better seasonally, and some create more or less balance in the outfit.

So this post will show you some necklines/jacket pairings that I like better than others.

Different styles of necklines:

Here’s a list of some common necklines. I’ll break it down with each one and tell you what jackets I would or wouldn’t wear with

  • Scoop Neck

    • Scoop neck is as versatile as it comes! You can wear this neckline with any coat, blazer, jacket or peacoat!
  • Crew neck

    • This neckline is similar to the scoop neck, but higher up on your neck. It’s still very versatile, but pay attention to if your neckline looks constricted at all when wearing crew necks and jackets over the top. Specifically more masculine crew neck tops, like graphic tees, feel the most pinched at the neckline when I’m wearing a denim or suede or leather jacket over the top.
  • Boatneck

    • I rarely wear boat neck tops, but personally I think their appeal is the wide neck which is covered up by any jacket. So if you’re wearing boat neck tops, choose a day to wear them when a jacket isn’t required!
  • Turtleneck

    • Turtlenecks are so wonderful in the colder months to keep your neck warm. And you can absolutely wear a jacket or a blazer or a coat over the top. But if you’re layering over a turtleneck sweater or dress, make sure the turtleneck and layer are similar in weight…a bulky turtleneck and a thick wool coat work great. A bulky turtleneck and a lightweight jacket will create imbalance and too much heaviness around your neck.
  • V-Neck

    • Another classic neckline option, and yes, it goes with basically everything! However, be careful with v-neck t-shirts that might get bunchy underneath a more structured jacket. You want your top to lay nicely underneath your jacket — no bulk or bunching, please!
  • Mock Neck

    • I love mock neck tops, and they can absolutely work with any style of jacket. But be careful with that pinched neck look…it’ll be a case by case situation, so do what feels right for the outfit and you!
  • Collared

    • Whenever I wear collared shirts, I’m wearing them unbuttoned a few buttons. I love that look, but it’s not super conducive to all jackets. The collar can get squashed or bunched underneath. If you’re wearing with a blazer to work, try putting the collar outside the jacket so it lays on top of the blazer’s collar and doesn’t get squished. If that doesn’t suit you, tuck it inside nicely the best you can.
  • Henley

    • Henley necklines are the ones with no collar, but a few buttons down the front. As with any buttoned shirt, I’d just recommend staying away from a jacket that has prominent buttons. For me, double buttons feels cluttered. Instead, choose a jacket with a zipper or one with neutral, more camouflaged buttons.
  • Hooded

    • I love a hoodie sweatshirt or a sweater with a hood. They’re particularly great with jackets and blazers with the hood sticking out. Definitely don’t tuck the hood inside! As for hooded jackets, just don’t pair them with hooded tops…no need for a double hood.
  • Cowl

    • Cowl necks tend to be more popular among a mature crowd and can be cute, but they also add a good amount of bulk at the neck which can be tricky under jackets. If you plan to close your jacket, I’d recommend not choosing a cowl neck top. Otherwise, just choose a jacket or coat or blazer that doesn’t have other embellishments or bulk at the lapels. You don’t need double bulk at your neckline and chest.

I’ve got a Get Dressed With Merrick video showing some examples of these on my instagram tonight…don’t miss it!

 

 

IF YOU LIKED THIS POST, YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

 

One Comment

  1. KINGESSAYS says:

    I really just keep wondering every time that how you can be so very knowledgeable as well as so very humble at the same time, that you just keep sharing your asset, your knowledge with others. Thanksgivings for all such great works you keep doing.

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